Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Plant Science & Physiology Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 :

Plant Science & Physiology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker A Hemantaranjan photo
Biography:

A Hemantaranjan, Professor, has his expertise in physiology of abiotic stresses and micronutrients. His significantly established doses of salicylic acid, zinc, brassinolide and paclobutrazol in stress mitigation are commendable. He elucidated several facts of underlying mechanisms for stress tolerance in crops after 39 years of research experience; Guiding 13 Ph.D.; has 30 years of post-graduate teaching experience; several years of administrative experience  in elite Central University. Published over 135 of his research papers and review articles in journals of international repute including proceedings of international/national symposia, recurrently cited world over especially in international journals, biological reviews including Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Books. Editor in Chief of the UGC Approved International Treatise Series on Advances in Plant Physiology to publish 17 volumes till date. Honoured with Agricultural Excellence Award, 2013 and Life Time Achievement Award, 2014; Member, Editorial Boards and reviewer of 16 international journals; delivering Guest Lectures/Keynote Address.

 

Abstract:

Sustained self-sufficiency and March towards food and nutritional security depend on crop improvement in rapidly limiting natural resources. Besides cereals, pulse production now needs understanding of intricate physiology by utilizing judiciously devised cutting edge technologies and consequently to develop climate resilient desirable genotypes with breeders and biotechnologists for relentlessly enhanced productivity. Abiotic stresses: drought, salinity, heat and flooding affect photosynthesis, nitrogen assimilation, protein synthesis, pollination and fertilization. In our experiments, seed hardened and foliage applied salicylic acid (SA) significantly alleviated salinity and drought in pea and chickpea respectively; brassinolide and micronutrient zinc individually mitigated salinity, whereas paclobutrazol alleviated harmful effects of flash flooding in mungbean by producing aerial roots with initiating arenchymatous tissue in roots. SA @ 1.0 to 1.5 mM; brassinolide @ 0.05mM and paclobutrazol @ 10 ppm provided protection against stresses (drought, salinity, heat and flash flooding) at critical developmental stages of seedling growth, reproduction (pollen formation, pollen, germination, fertilization) and seed development. Encouraging findings regarding SA induced micronutrients uptake with improved cellular metabolism through improved water use efficiency, enhanced antioxidative ezymes activity and synthesis of antioxidants of compatible nature under abiotic stresses were recorded, which helped in elucidating the underlying mechanisms for tolerance in crop plants. Conclusion and Significance: Stress tolerance may be achieved by the maintenance, activation, and enhanced function of physiological systems that are especially sensitive to disruption by increased levels of stress. Information on stress-inducible genes, genetic control of stress responses and signaling pathways offer a chance for creating a clearer picture of plant responses and adaptations to different stresses.

 

Keynote Forum

G. J. Sharma

Manipur University, India

Keynote: In vitro propagation and DNA profiling of Acorus calamus Linn

Time : 00:00

Plant Science & Physiology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker G. J. Sharma  photo
Biography:

Prof Sharma had PhD (Radiation Biology) from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi and Post-Doctoral Research from Department of Biochemistry, Brunel University, London. He was a Visiting Professor at National Institute of Food and Nutrition Research, Rome. Recently retired as Professor (HAG), he continues as UGC-BSR Faculty Fellow (Life Sciences) at Manipur University. He has 88 publications in international journals, supervised 20 PhDs, participated in over 75 conferences and delivered 24 invited lectures in conferences held in USA, UK, France, China, Netherlands, Italy, Singapore, Thailand and India. He is a reviewer of 12 international journals of repute. His research areas are plant biotechnology, food irradiation, free radicals and dietary antioxidants. He is a Member, Scientific Panel on GMOs and Foods, Food Safety & Standard Authority of India, Government of India.

Abstract:

Sweet flag (Acorus calamus Linn.) is an important littoral plant widely used in traditional medicine since times immemorial. Four cytotypes, viz., diploid, triploid, tetraploid and hexaploid are found world-wide. Two cytotypes, viz., diploid and triploid are found in Manipur, India. Different cytotypes show wide variations in morphology and chemical composition of essential oils in rhizomes and leaves. The plants is used for anti-spasmodic, anti-diarrhoeic, carminative, anti-helminthic, anti-depressant and CNS anxiolytic properties, as tonic, stimulant and aphrodisiac, for treating rheumatism, toothache and respiratory ailments. The aromatic oils are used for flavoring alcoholic beverages and as fragrances in perfumes and sacred oils. The crude extract can prevent acrylamide-induced limb paralysis and increase dopamine receptor in corpus striatum, prevent noise stress-induced changes in rat brain and significant hypolipidemic activities. Bioactive molecules present are acorin, α- and β-asarone, asaryldehyde, caryophylene, isoasarone, methyl isoeugenol and safrol. β-asarone content varies with ploidy level. Triploids contain 7-7.8% β-asarone as against 73-88% in tetraploids. Diploids do not contain β-asarone which is known carcinogen. Chinese medicine suggests its beneficial effects on memory disorder, learning performance and senescence. Clonal propagation of diploid and triploid cytotypes have been developed using dual-phase culture. Microrhizome induction for propagation has significance in conservational and sustainable development priorities. Accessions across nineteen different populations have been investigated. RAPD and ISSR markers have been employed for understanding genetic variabilities of the species. Amplification of genomic DNAs reveals 35.3% polymorphism.  Marker indices and resolving powers indicate that ISSR markers are more efficient. Similarity matrix has been used to construct dendrogram based on UPGMA analysis and grouped accessions into two clusters in tune with ploidy level. 

  • Plant Genetics and Epigenetics | Plant Science and Natural Products |Plant Genome Sciences |Agricultural Science| Biodiversity and Evolution of Plants|Forest Science and Technology
Location: 1
Speaker
Biography:

Xiaochuang Cao has his expertise in plant nutrition and rice high yield cultivation technology. Recently, he focused to explain why the mixed-N (NO3-+NH4+) nutrition enhances rice growth under water-deficit condition, from the aspects of photosynthesis, root-shoot carbon partitioning, and hormone signaling. His results provide new insights for improving plant tolerance to water stress via nutrient resource management in certain drought-prone
regions.

 

Abstract:

To investigate the response of rice growth to nitrogen forms under water-deficit condition, and its intrinsic mechanisms involved in photosynthesis, hormone signaling and root-shoot photoassimilates partitioning. A hydroponic experiment supplying different N forms (NO3-, NH4+, NO3-+NH4+) was conducted in a greenhouse under water stress.Water stress significantly inhibited rice biomass, leaf area, leaf chlorophyll and Rubisco contents. However, mixed-N nutrition substantially alleviated these inhibitions compared with NO3- nutrition. Mixed-N nutrition maintained a higher, ETR, –§PSII and NP, thus causing higher photosynthesis and photochemical efficiency. Water stress up-regulated leaf SPS, but reduced leaf InvA. Water stress decreased IAA in leaf and cytokinins in root, and their contents in mixed-N nutrition were higher than those in NO3- nutrition. In mixed-N nutrition, the up-regulation of leaf SPS and IAA and the reduction of SSc and InvA in roots jointly resulted in the accumulation of sucrose in leaves and the inhibition of its transportation to roots, finally reducing R/S.The inhibited R/S reduces the photosynthate for root redundant growth, but provides more photosynthate for shoots, also increases its drought tolerance. We concluded that the strengthened water-deficit tolerance in mixed-N-supplied rice seedlings is closely associated with the improvement of photosynthesis and photochemical efficiency, hormone balance and root-shoot carbon partitioning.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Osondu Chimezie Nworu loves those who rule over their people in righteousness and in the fear of God because he strongly believes that successful management of cultural pluralism and diversity becomes an inborn skill on anyone in a position of authority when the one rules with love. That is the reason he is continually researching, evaluating, exposing and denouncing with scientific articles to educate people, governments and organization that displace, marginalize, persecute, devastate people and environments whether the people maltreated are  Ibos, Ogonis, Niger Deltans, and Rohingyas etc. The approach is the same, he sees his works as a means - using intellectualism to educate and promote public awareness of stampede human rights and hidden injustice by corrupt governments in Nigeria and elsewhere that showcases the contrary and do not devote time to thinking of the people

Abstract:

No one can underrate the much significant contributions and potentials for Agriculture in the totality of the Nigerian economy. The key to developing agriculture in Nigeria is studying, researching and identify means to effectively support the small-scale farming practiced by a majority of the populace. The paper is not advocating the abandonment of the medium and large-scale farming levels, but the small-scaled and scattered farming that are prevalently practiced has evinced the needs to empower more this category through receiving more support from aid donors and the governments. Therefore, identifying ways to encourage this level of farming is vital, though presently more emphasis is being given to the middle and large-scale farming resulting in no visible increase of the gross national products. And for a fact that the above 75 percent of the population that engages in agriculture even the percentage gets to about 95 in most urban and in the rural areas during the rainy season are small-scale farmers. These are the lots of the small-scale farmers that cultivate the greatest part (90%) of the 83 million hectares of the 98 million hectares arable land mass. As in Nigeria small-scale farming accounts for about 95% of total agricultural output - Federal Ministry of Agriculture, 2005 (CTA, 2008)

Since, agricultural science is so a broad multidisciplinary field the goal to pursue self-sufficient in food production to ameliorate the lives of the masses by improving the capacity of the small-scale farmers who effectively produce almost the food consumed through the innovative applications of some parts of the discipline of agricultural science. Especially, by applying Soil Science, and Production techniques like irrigation management, recommended nitrogen inputs etc. thereby improving the agricultural productivity, optimally dissemination of information and free urban/rural farming vocation skills pieces of training. Apparently, applying the value and practical implementation of agricultural science such as soil science and  Science Production techniques to Nigerian agriculture shall invariably enhance productivity and distance the farmers from the stress of relying always on seasonal rainfall and bush fallow system especially in the Niger Delta region where family farming was prevalent and gas flaring rate is high  and UNEP in Ogoniland (topsoil) clean-up operations would ameliorate the environment so as to grow healthier efficient crops for consumption.

 

  • Medicinal and Aromatic Plant Sciences|Plant & Forest Ecology and its Diversity|Plant Tissue Culture and Plant Biotechnology|Plant Nanotechnology & Molecular Biotechnology
Location: 2

Session Introduction

Atul Kumar

University of Agriculture and Technology, India

Title: Medicinal and aromatic plants of Himalayan zone and their therapeutic properties for pharmaceutical industry
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Atul Kumar is presently working as Professor (Plant Physiology) at College of Basic Sciences and Humanities of GB Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, India. After obtaining his Masters in Plant Physiology (1977) and Ph.D. in Horticulture (1983), Dr. Kumar is engaged in Teaching and Research in various aspects of Plant Sciences for over 30 years. He has expertise in the area of Plant Tissue Culture of important Fruits, Vegetables, Ornamentals, and Medicinal and Aromatic Plants. Physiology of Abiotic stress in plants is another area of his interest. He has visited several countries in connection with participation in conferences, symposia for presentation of his research work and also received Advanced International Training on Plant Biotechnology at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. He has authored three Text-cum-Reference Books on Plant Tissue Culture and has over 80 publications of different categories to his credit.   

 

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: Medicinal and aromatic plants have played a vital role in providing healthcare to man since the dawn of civilization. India is bestowed upon with varying agro-climatic conditions by nature and thus constitutes one among the richest gene pool of rare medicinal and aromatic plants and other valuable herbs in the word. In fact, the kind of biodiversity present in Himalayan region is available nowhere in the world. Varying geographical features along with climatic conditions, and wide range of altitude, ecology, and topography have contributed in making the Himalayan region a rich repository in biodiversity.  

IMPORTANCE OF MAP AND OTHER VALUABLE HERBS: Over 3000 plant species are known for their medicinal properties in India. Several of the natural products derived from plants include life-saving drugs like codeine and morphine (analgesic antitussive alkaloids from Papaver somniferum-the opium poppy),  taxol (derived from Taxus baccata to cure cancer patients), vincristine and vinblastine (alkaloids extracted from periwinkle-Catharanthus roseus to treat leukemia),  quinine (the anti-malarial alkaloid derived from Cinchona bark); essences and fragrances like rose oil, jasmine; pesticides like nicotine (from Nicotiana tabacum) and pyrethrin (from Pyrethrum cineraryfolium) and raw material for Several of the natural products derived from plants include life-saving drugs like codeine and morphine (analgesic antitussive alkaloids from Papaver somniferum-the opium poppy),  taxol (derived from Taxus baccata to cure cancer patients), vincristine and vinblastine (alkaloids extracted from periwinkle-Catharanthus roseus to treat leukemia),  quinine (the anti-malarial alkaloid derived from Cinchona bark); essences and fragrances like rose oil, jasmine; pesticides like nicotine (from Nicotiana tabacum) and pyrethrin (from Pyrethrum cineraryfolium) and raw material for various industrial establishments such as pine oil, fatty acids and natural rubber. Important medicinal plants presently exploited by pharmaceutical industry in India along with endangered species of rare medicinal plants of Himalayan region are discussed. 

Bharti Singh

VitaeGen Biotech-Educational and Research Institute, India

Title: Biomedical application of natural molecule chitosan and its chitooligosaccharides
Speaker
Biography:

Bharti Singh is a sincere scholar of biological Sciences. Currently working VitaeGen Biotech- Educational and research Institute (Run by Ritesh Education & Development Society), Varanasi as a research associate on various aspect of diseases. Her Ph.D work on population dynamics of methanotrophic bacteria. Having Ph.D and M.Sc. in Botany. She also worked as scientist in Department of Microbiology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University. She attended more than 10 National and International conferences. Published more than 20 research papers Received 2 best paper presentation awards in various National and International conferences. Qualified national level ARS-NET-2010 Basic Plant Sciences. Act as resource person in 2 workshops conducting by Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology & Sciences.

 

Abstract:

The Chitosan, which is biodegradable, non-toxic and biocompatible non-allergenic has been shown to be particularly useful in many fields including food, cosmetics, biomedicine, agriculture and possess versatile functional properties such as antitumor enhancing properties, immunostimulating effects, antimicrobial activity, free radical scavenging activity arthritis controlling activity. Chitosan shows its biological activity only in acidic medium because of its poor solubility at pH above 6.5 and low absorbability of non-digestible and high molecular polysaccharides. In this respect, chitosan oligosaccharides, because of their shorter chain length, display a reduced viscosity and are soluble in aqueous media at pH values close to neutrality, which increases their bioavailability and opens a wide range of new potential applications. Keeping in mind the above biomedical aspects of chitosan the present study has been conducted to investigate the therapeutic effect of chitooligosaccharides in diabetes mellitus, the study showed that blood glucose, urea and creatinine were decreased in diabetic mice administered with chitooligosaccharides. Chitooligosaccharides  lowered the serum SGOT and SGPT levels which reveals the protective effect and normal functioning of liver in reversing the organ damage due to diabetes which clearly observed by high levels of serum transaminases in diabetic control. Chitooligosaccharides also resulted a significant recovery in the levels of biosensors of lipid profile. chitooligosaccharides therapy increased the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in hepatic tissues of treated diabetic mice. The work exposes that chitooligosaccharides has significant effect for curing diabetic mellitus and related complications.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Deepmala katiyar is a very laborious and dynamic scholar of life sciences. Presently she is doing Post Doctoral Studies on Plant Growth promoting rhizobacteria of sugarcane. Her Ph.D work on chitosan and its derivative chitooligosaccharides and their biomedical application like diabetes, oxidative stress and related complications. Having Ph.D and M.Sc. in Biochemistry. She attended more than 20 National and International conferences. Published 25 research papers and 4 book chapter and 1 book. Received 1 young scientist awards and 6 best paper presentation awards from various National and International conferences. Editorial board member of International Journal of Pharma and Biosciences. Received 2 certificate of excellence in reviewing in recognition of an outstanding contribution to the quality of the journal. Certificate of Excellence by Science and technology awards 2015. Qualified national level ICAR’s SRF (AIR 3rd), ARS-NET-2009 Biochemistry/Plant Physiology, ARS-NET- 2010 Basic Plant Sciences. Act as resource person in 2 workshops.

 

Abstract:

The past couple of decades, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) will begin to replace the use of chemicals in agriculture, horticulture, silviculture and environmental cleanup strategies. Scientific researchers involve multidisciplinary approaches to understand adaptation of PGPR, effects on plant physiology and growth induced systemic resistance, biocontrol of plant pathogens and biofertilization. PGPR are naturally occurring soil bacteria that aggressively colonize in plant roots and play a vital role in crop protection, growth promotion and in the improvement of soil health. The study was conducted to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria from sugarcane rhizosphere and assess their potential with combination of chitosan for plant growth and biocontrol activities. Isolated rhizobacteria were characterized by morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular identification of bacteria by 16S rRNA sequencing. They were screened in vitro plant growth promoting traits viz., production of Indole acetic acid, Hydrogen cyanide, Ammonia production and antifungal activity against Colletotrichum falcatum. Five isolates showed highest plant growth promoting activities. All isolates identified as Enterobacter hormaechei, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus pumilus. For biocontrol activities against Colletotrichum falcatum, the significant growth inhibition was observed. This study was further preceded in sugarcane. Sugarcane setts were soaked into PGPR and chitosan solution for 12 hours. Germination percentage, growth parameters, chlorophyll, proline content, nitrate reductase activity, anti-oxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase activity showed significant findings. The study is suggesting that PGPR and chitosan can be used as an effective biological fertilizer combination for increasing sugarcane production.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof Sharma had PhD (Radiation Biology) from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi and Post-Doctoral Research from Department of Biochemistry, Brunel University, London. He was a Visiting Professor at National Institute of Food and Nutrition Research, Rome. Recently retired as Professor (HAG), he continues as UGC-BSR Faculty Fellow (Life Sciences) at Manipur University. He has 88 publications in international journals, supervised 20 PhDs, participated in over 75 conferences and delivered 24 invited lectures in conferences held in USA, UK, France, China, Netherlands, Italy, Singapore, Thailand and India. He is a reviewer of 12 international journals of repute. His research areas are plant biotechnology, food irradiation, free radicals and dietary antioxidants. He is a Member, Scientific Panel on GMOs and Foods, Food Safety & Standard Authority of India, Government of India.

Abstract:

The broad field of free radicals and antioxidants covers an emerging area known as redox biology, and has been perceived as focussing around the use of antioxidant supplements to prevent a variety of human diseases. During the events of evolution, the emergence of photosynthetic system in aerobic organisms, plants in particular, generates reactive oxygen species and has opened up a paradoxical situation compelling life confront hostile environment and to be able to adapt, the redox processes have become increasingly significant. Antioxidants/free radicals permeate the entire living systems in the cellular milieu. Life is a balance between the two like a tug-of-war: antioxidants serve to decrease the levels of free radicals permitting them to perform useful biological functions without causing much damage. However, some damages are inevitable requiring repair systems to maintain cellular integrity and viability.

Reactive oxygen species are all over the cellular environment in aerobic microbes, plants and animals. These species protect life from various types of infections and involve in critical signaling pathways. Eventually, these species also often kill cells, tissues and organs in the end. The continual damages by these species, failing repair pathways, can cause age-related tumor development, neurodenerative diseases and several human disorders. It would have been wonderful if life had evolved entirely in the anaerobic environment, in which case, the life-spans would have been much longer and diseases would have rarely occurred.

Interestingly, several medicinal plants possessing ‘bio-active molecules’ can prevent human diseases. These molecules having diverse chemical structures possess high antioxidant profiles and encounter damaging radical species very efficiently at time scales of micro-, nano-, pico- and femto-seconds in cellular environment thereby preventing molecular damages to DNA and membranes. In this presentation, some of these aspects shall be discussed with reference to a few medicinal plants such as turmeric and tropical ginger.