Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Plant Physiology & Pathology Dallas, Texas, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Andy Pereira

University of Arkansas, USA

Keynote: Systems level analysis of abiotic stress response and plant productivity

Time : 9:30-10:10

OMICS International Plant Physiology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Andy Pereira  photo
Biography:

Andy Pereira is the Anheuser-Busch Endowed Professor in Rice Plant Molecular Genetics at the University of Arkansas in ayetteville. He completed his PhD from Iowa State University, with postdoctoral studies from Max-Planck Institute (Germany), and worked as a scientist in Plant Research International (Netherlands) and Virginia Tech before joining the University of Arkansas in 2011. He has published more than 100 publications in the fields of insertional mutagenesis, Arabidopsis and rice functional genomics, systems biology studies of drought stress in interaction with basic biological processes.

Abstract:

To dissect the complex interaction between plant productivity and abiotic stress factors, rice gene regulatory networks were developed to identify associations between transcription factors (TFs) and essential biological processes/pathways perturbed under abiotic stress. The TF HYR (Higher Yield Rice) was found positively associated with photosynthetic carbohydrate metabolism (PCM) and other key processes affected by environmental stress. Overexpression of HYR in rice enhanced photosynthesis and yield components, with higher grain yield under control conditions and drought or high night temperatures at critical reproductive stages.rnChIP and gene expression analysis of HYR rice revealed a network of genes in the HYR regulated pathway determining productivity traits, supporting a role for HYR as a key regulator of genes involved in plant growth and grain yield under environmental stress. In other studies of stress responsive regulatory genes using knockout mutants, morpho-physiological analysis revealed a class of mutants compromised in growth under drought (GUD), showing reduction in yield under stress conditions and underlying networks of genes involved in PCM. To characterize the natural variation for drought response and grain yield in rice, a diverse population of ricerngenotypes were analyzed for their differential physiological and transcriptome responses to drought. Integration of the transcriptomerndata from mutants and overexpression lines of drought tolerance genes, as well as the diverse drought tolerant rice genotypes, is beingrnused to construct integrated regulatory networks to identify regulatory networks determining yield and stress tolerance in rice.

Keynote Forum

Shubhash Deokule

Savitribai Phule Pune University, India

Keynote: New horizon in plant science

Time : 10:10-10:50

OMICS International Plant Physiology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shubhash Deokule photo
Biography:

S S Deokule has completed his PhD in 1989 from Pune University. At present, he is the senior most Professor in the Department of Botany and HOD from 2010-2013. He has great contribution in the study of Indian medicinal plants, guided about 30 Doctoral and 22 MPhil students. He has published a total of 175 research articles along with 12 books. He is associated with many national and international academic bodies and also appointed as Member, Board of Directors for Asian Society of Pharmacognosy. He has received many prestigious awards at national and international level with gold medals. His area of research interest is mainly in Pharmacognosy, Ethno-Botany, Ethno-Pharmacognosy, Ethno-Pharmacology, Medicinal Plant Tissue culture and Biodiversity.

Abstract:

We have a 3000 year old story in our country: Charaka the ancient physician was asked by his teachers to get him a plant that wasrnquiet useless, he returned empty- handed saying that there was no such plant. It is, therefore, in our own interest to conservernour plant as also animal as well as micro organism wealth. There is growing realization throughout the world about the urgent needrnto conserve the biological diversity.rnWe need to conserve plant species because of human – dependence on them for many different uses and indeed for our survival.rnPlants provide our basic food crops, building materials and medicines as well as oils, lubricants, rubber and other latexes, resins,rnwaxes, perfumes, dyes and fibers. There are over 84.3 million tribals, belonging to diverse ethnic groups. As per the classificationrnmade by anthropologists on linguistic basis there are 550 communities of 227 ethnic groups are inhabited in various parts of India.rnThe tribal people of India mostly live in the forests, hills, plateaus and naturally isolated regions. They are playing most important rolernin conservation.rn21st century is the century of Biology powered and propelled by scientific knowledge and technological expertise. There are fourrntechnologies viz. Herbal technology, Biotechnology, Nano-Technology and Information technology (Bioinformatics) are going to bernthe most powerful elements that are crucial for prosperity and welfare for the people of nations.rnHerbal technologies involving value added plant products which can be called as herbal technology. This includes Herbal drugsrnand pharmaceuticals, Neutraceuticals, Functional foods, Designer foods or health foods and Health drinks, Cosmaceuticals, Biocontrolrnagents and Bio-pesticides.rnThere is a clear-cut Bioprospecting Linkage and Leads observed in between Biodiversity & Indigenous Knowledge / TraditionalrnKnowledge, Conservation, Sustainable use, Benefit sharing, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology, Information technology, Herbalrntechnology, Bioprospecting, IPR, Drug development, Pharmaceuticals, Agro chemistry, cosmetics, proteins, enzymes, new croprnvarieties, GMOs, GM foods, design etc.rnWe are talking about the sustainable development but, on the other side there are many threats to global biodiversity viz. overrnexploitation due to population explosion, Deforestation, Mined areas, Road constructions, Dam construction, Industrialization, Overrncultivation, Over grazing, Weir system of irrigation, Introduction of new species and Environmental Pollution. There are some of thernnatural disasters like Drought, Sand dunes, Ravines, River bank, Water lodged, Marshy areas, Soil pH and Tsunami. There is urgentrnneed to work together at global level to save our mother nature.

Break: Coffee Break @ 10:50-11:05
OMICS International Plant Physiology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker B N Reddy photo
Biography:

B N Reddy has Published 75 research papers, contributed chapters in books brought out by reputed publishers. He is the author of Systematics and Occurrence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi brought out by Lap Lambert Academic Publishing. He has presented 114 research papers at national and international conferences, organized 14 seminars/conferences, delivered Plenary Lectures on invitation in the international conferences/symposia held in Austria, China, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Malaysia, Mexico, Turkey, USA and interacted with many Nobel Laureates.

Abstract:

Aflatoxicoses are diseases caused by aflatoxins in livestock, domestic animals and humans throughout the world. Exposure tornthese mycotoxins is mostly by ingestion but also occurs by the dermal and inhalation routes. The susceptibility of individuals tornmycotoxins varies considerably depending on species, age, sex and nutrition. Acute mycotoxicoses can cause serious and sometimesrnfatal diseases also. The possibility of mycotoxin intoxication should be considered when a sudden acute disease occurs in a largernpopulation when there is no evidence of infection with a known etiological agent and there is no improvement in the clinical picturernfollowing treatment. The global nature of the mycotoxin problem is based on well-documented human mycotoxicoses such asrnergotism in Europe, alimentary toxic aleukia in Russia, acute aflatoxicoses in South and East Asia and human primary liver cancerrnin Africa and South East Asia. Ochratoxin A is suspected to play a role in Balkan endemic nephropathy in Yugoslavia and chronicrninterstitial nephritis in North Africa. The present paper reviews the disease outbreaks of aflatoxicoses in developing countries with anrnemphasis on Indian cases, due to the ingestion of contaminated food and feed with aflatoxins

  • Track 6: Plant Ecology & Agro- diversity Track 7: Plant Biotechnology and Tissue culture Track 8: Plant Genetics and molecular biology of plant Track 9: Phytochemicals Track 10: Mycology & Phycology
Location: Allen

Session Introduction

Russel J Reiter

UT Health Science Center, USA

Title: Phytomelatonin: Helping plants to survive and to thrive

Time : 11:50-12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Russel J Reiter, PhD, is a Professor of Cell Biology at the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas. He has been awarded 3 honorary MD degrees and 1 honorary DSc Degree. He has received numerous awards for his research including the A. Ross McIntyre Gold Medal (USA), US Senior Scientist Award (Germany), Lezoni Lincee Award (Italy), the Inaugural Aaron B. Lerner Award (FASEB, USA), etc. His scientifi c publications have been cited in excess of 90,000 times (Google Scholar) and his h-index is 145. He is on Thomson Reuters List of Highly Cited Scientists (top 100 in his field).

Abstract:

Melatonin is synthesized in plants from the amino acid tryptophan. Initially, melatonin will be decarboxylated to tryptamine and this molecule then hydroxylated to serotonin. Th e conversion of serotonin to melatonin may be similar to that in animals, although there is some debate about this. It is assumed that serotonin is acted upon by N-acetyltransferase (NAT) to generate N-acetylserotonin; the latter molecule is then catalyzed to N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine (melatonin) by acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT) (formally known as hydroxylindole-O- methyltransferase or HIOMT). Melatonin may not be the fi nal product in some plant species, since melatonin is acted upon by 2-hydroxylase to produce 2-hydroxymelatonin. Melatonin and 2-hydroxymelatonin function as free radical scavengers to detoxify reactive oxygen species that otherwise damage critical molecules in plant cells. Additionally, melatonin is a potent growth promoting agent in plants. For example, when soybean seeds are coated with a solution that contains melatonin, a larger percentage of the seeds will germinate, plants grow faster and larger and the number of seeds and seed pods will be increased. Th us, melatonin enhances product yield in soybeans. Similarly, when seed corn or cucumber seeds are hydroprimed with melatonin, the percentage of the seeds that germinate elevated and product yield also increased. Plants treated with melatonin either pre- or post-germination are also more resistant to damage by environmental perturbations that interfere with photosynthesis and growth than control plants which are not treated with melatonin. Collectively, the results on the functions of melatonin in plants indicate that this indoleamine is highly beneficial in terms of protecting the plants from stressors and in improving productivity, actions that could have a major impact on food availability.

Deshpal S Verma

Ohio State University, USA

Title: Building of cell plate during cytokinesis in plant cell

Time : 12:20-12:50

Speaker
Biography:

Desh Pal S Verma is a full Professor at the Ohio State University, USA. He obtained his BSc degree in Biology and Chemistry, MSc degree in Botany from Agra University, India, and PhD degree in Plant Physiology and Biochemistry from the University of Western Ontario, Canada. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Fellow of the Third World Academy of Sciences, Italy. His pioneering research work includes the identifi cation and characterization of nudulins and phragmoplastin, and genes responsible for proline and callose biosynthesis in plants. He has served on the editorial boards for several international journals, edited 11 scholarly books, and published over 160 original research papers.

Abstract:

Cytokinesis in plant cells involves building a cell plate as the fi nal step in generating two cells. Th e cell plate is built in the center of phragmoplast by fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles. Th is step imposes an architectural problem where ballooning of the fused structures has to be avoided to create a plate like structure. Th is is achieved by an unique mechanism vesicles are squeezed into dumbbell-shaped vesicle-tubule-vesicle (VTV) structures with the help of phragmoplastin, a homolog of dynamin. These structures are fused at their ends in a star-shaped body creating a tubulovesicular "honeycomb-like" structure in the center of phragmoplast. Phragmoplastin was shown to interact with Cell-Plate-specifi c Callose synthase encoded by CalS1 gene. Th is protein further intracts with a UDP-glucose transferase forming a complex that produces copious amounts of callose needed to form the cell plate. Once the plate reaches the periphery of the cell, then cellulose synthase takes over and deposit cellulose microfi brils on the cell plate making a rigid cell wall. Th e identifi cation of Phragmoplastin and Callose synthase complex alloed us to work out the mechanism by which cell plate is built during cytokinesis in plants.

Break: Lunch Break: 12:50-13:30 @ Waterfall Atrium

Andy Pereira

University of Arkansas, USA

Title: Regulation of the lignocellulose pathway in rice as a model for grasses

Time : 13:30-14:00

Speaker
Biography:

Andy Pereira completed his PhD from Iowa State University, with postdoctoral studies from Max-Planck Institute (Germany), and worked as a scientist in Plant Research International (Netherlands) and Virginia Tech before joining the University of Arkansas as Anheuser-Busch Endowed Professor in Rice Plant Molecular Genetics. He has published more than 100 publications in the fields of insertional mutagenesis, Arabidopsis and rice functional genomics, systems biology studies of drought stress in interaction with basic biological processes.

Abstract:

In the quest for alternative energy sources, biomass feedstocks play an important role. Crop wastes are oft en overlooked because of the complexities involved in adapting crops for industrial scale utilization in biofuels. Nevertheless, cellulose from plant biomass is the largest renewable energy resource of carbon fixed from the atmosphere, which can be converted into fermentable sugars for production into ethanol. Rice straw especially is a major crop waste that is oft en burnt or removed from fi elds. However, the cellulose present as lignocellulosic biomass is embedded in a hemicellulose and lignin matrix from which it needs to be extracted for effi cient processing. In our research we found that overexpression of the Arabidopsis transcription factor SHINE (AtSHN) in rice altered lignocellulose composition, increasing cellulose by 34% and reducing lignin by as much as 45% with no compromise in plant strength and agronomic performance, supporting its use as a regulatory switch for altering lignocellulose composition in grasses. Th e AtSHN regulatory pathway was characterized by ChIP-Seq and ChIP-qPCR with AtSHN affi nity tagged lines, and AtSHN targets confi rmed by transactivation assays of promoter targets in rice protoplasts. Knockdown lines of the rice OsSHN gene were characterized phenotypically and the downstream pathway analyzed by RNASeq analysis. Integration of the information from AtSHN and OsSHN functional studies in rice, provide a framework model of the role of the SHN gene family in regulating biochemical and physiological pathways in rice and underpin its potential utility in understanding regulation of the lignocellulosic pathway in grasses.

Speaker
Biography:

He is working as a researcher at Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. His research experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study. His research interests as a researcher reflect him in wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

Abstract:

Developing wheat varieties with improved nitrogen use effi ciency is very desirable, and may off er a sustainable solution to improve crop yields with less fertilizer application. Roots are the main site for nutrient uptake; their size and distribution in soil profi les, and uptake activity largely determine nutrient uptake effi ciency. However, low temperature at seedling stage inhibits root development of winter wheat and nutrient bioavailability; and root senescence during grain filling is becoming a limiting factor for achieving high yield in modern wheat varieties. By screening genes in response to low nitrogen stress and nitrate treatment, we identifi ed a low nitrogen inducied transcription factor TaNFYA-6B and a nitrate inducible transcription factor TaNAC2-5A. Overexpression of these genes in wheat increased root growth and nitrate infl ux rate of wheat seedlings and improved grain yield under both low and high nitrogen conditions. Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an essential role in the metabolism of nitrogen. By analyzing the mini-core collection (MCC) of the Chinese wheat germplasm, we identifi ed a favorable allele of GS2, TaGS2-A1b. Expressing proTaGS2-A1b::TaGS2-A1b in wheat signifi cantly increased nitrogen uptake during grain-fi lling period, and grain yield under both low and high nitrogen conditions. Our results suggest that improving the root ability in efficiently acquiring nitrogen at seedling stage and aft er fl owering is crucial in engineering nitrogen use efficiency in wheat.

Hui Tag

Mississippi State University, USA

Title: Biodiversity of wild food and medicinal plants of Eastern Himalayas

Time : 14:30-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

The corresponding author Dr. Hui Tag did his Master of Science in Botany from Rajiv Gandhi University (2002), Arunachal Pradesh, India and obtained his PhD Degree in Botany from the same University in the year 2008. Dr. Tag has been working as Senior Assistant Professor in the Department of Botany, Rajiv Gandhi University, Rono Hills, Doimukh, Arunachal Pradesh since 2005, and he is currently pursuing his DBT GOI sponsored Post Doctoral study as Visiting Scientist (DBT Overseas Associate) in the Department of Plant and Soil Science, Mississippi State University, MS USA. His focal research area is taxonomy, ethnobotany, biodiversity and physio-biochemical approach to understand the value and potency of traditional food and medicinal plants. Dr. Tag is a dynamic researcher and also a member of several scientifi c and professional bodies and also participated as UNDP observer in COP meeting of CBD in last three years. He has more than 50 research papers published in national and international journals of repute.

Abstract:

Eastern Himalaya comprises of State of Eastern Nepal, Bhutan and Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh endowed with rich cultural and biological diversity. Th is region has been rated as one among the top 12 Global Biodiversity Hotspot by IUCN (2000, 2005). Th e cultural and biodiversity of Arunachal Pradesh is exceptionally unique and rich with presence of several linguistic group and endemic biological taxa most of them being signifi cant medicinal and food plants which help in sustaining local culture and economy of the Eastern Himalayan tribes. Present paper highlights ethnobotanical aspects of the selected food and medicinal plants used by the tribes of Arunachal Pradesh. Apart from ethnobotanical knowledge bases, paper also deals with physio-biochemical and pharmacological aspects of selected species including which include Centella asiatica, Chloranthus erectus, Potentilla peduncularis, Vaccinium glauco album, Drynaria propinqua, Rosa sericea, Quercus griffi thii, and Quercus semecarpifolia. Th e fi eld and lab result shows that the local communities of Eastern Himalayan region of India are rich in diverse uses of traditional food and medicinal plants. Food and medicinal plants used by the local tribes are rich in antioxidant bioactive constituents which could be used as anti-infl ammatory and anticancer agents.

Speaker
Biography:

A Sabitha Rani has completed her PhD from the Dept. of Genetics, CPMB, Osmania University. Her research interests are tissue culture studies of medicinal plants and Plant Biotechnology. She has published 30 research papers in national and international reputed journals. She has also presented many research papers in national and international conferences. She is the member of many academic bodies and also the member of editorial board for many research journals.

Abstract:

Spilanthes acmella Murr. was successfully micropropagated using nodal segments and apical shoot tips. The explants were cultured on MS medium supplemented with diff erent concentrations of BAP for shoot initiation. All the concentrations of BAP alone induced shoot regeneration with varying frequency. High regeneration frequency was observed at 2 mg/l concentration of BAP in apical shoot tips (70%) and nodal segment (60%). Th e regenerated shoots were multiplied on MS medium with diff erent concentrations of BAP alone and in combination with NAA and IAA. Highest frequency of multiple shoot induction (90%) was observed at 2.0 mg/L BAP + 1.0 mg/L IAA with maximum number of shoots 25 and 40 aft er fi rst and second subculture. Th e highest shoot length (4.8 cm) was observed at 2.0 mg/L BAP + 1.0 mg/L NAA with 80% shoot multiplication. Th e regenerated shoots were transferred onto rooting media with diff erent concentrations of IBA and NAA. All the concentrations of IBA and NAA produced roots with varying frequencies. High percentage of rooting (90%) was observed for 1.0 mg/L IBA and NAA at 1.0 mg/L also showed good percentage of rooting (80%). Rooted plantlets were hardened and established in pots with 100% survival rate.

Biography:

Md Rais Uddin Rashed has completed his Master’s in Agricultural Sciences with thesis title: "Effect of substrates on plant transpiration rate under several vapour pressure deficit level" with Panicum maximum cv. tanzania and Pepper (Capsicum capsaularis) at the University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany. He obtained his Bachelor’s in Agriculture and Masters in Genetics and Plant Breeding with thesis title: Screening of salt tolerant genotypes in vitro in tomato) from Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. He worked as an Assistant Researcher at “Eurofins Agroscience Services Ecotox GmbH” Agro based company for almost two years on part time basis in Germany. He also worked at Genetics and Molecular Biological Laboratory for one and half year as a Research Assistant.

Abstract:

Soil salinity is one of the most important abiotic stress that limit crop production. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is moderately tolerant to salinity and is typically cultivated in regions that are exposed to soil salinization. The aim of the study was to characterize phenotype response to salt stress under in vitro conditions of 14 tomato genotypes BARI Tomato-2, BARI Tomato-11, BD-7260, BD-7290, BD-7295, BD-7286, BD-7269, BD-7258, BD-7289, BD-7292, BD-7291, BD-7302, BD-7301, and BD-7762. Tomato seeds were cultured with 0 mM (control), 50 mM, 100 mM, 150 mM and 250 mM NaCl in nutrient solutions. The effect of the stress applied on the morphological traits was evaluated in 9 day-old seedlings. The analysis of variance showed that the highest root length was grown on 50 mM NaCl solution. The shortest root length was observed entries BD-7260 at 250 mM. Longer roots (11.6 cm) were developed by the plants from the solutions containing 50 mM NaCl in entries BD-7302. NaCl concentration in the medium significantly affected the root length and plant weight of tomato. Genotypic distribution of weight LS means revealed that genotypes BARI-2 and the Line BD-7292 is the highest performed and the Line BD-7762 is the lowest performed. These findings indicated some salt tolerant tomato genotypes which will be promising for future hybridization program. Analysis of novel genes as well as some previously identified genes such as PIPs, LTPs, AGPs, PRPs, GRPs etc. which showed protective roles in different abiotic stresses to other crops is quiet necessary and the presence and expression pattern of those genes in these screened genotypes of tomato will provide powerful information for over-expression of those genes in transgenic plants those will confer salt tolerances to the cultivated tomato varieties.

Speaker
Biography:

Javed Hussain Umrani is working as a Teaching Assistant at Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan and PhD scholar at the Biotechnology Research Institute (BRI), Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China. He has published papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Drought is a major environmental factor that harshly lowers plant production worldwide. Globally, maize (Zea mays L.) is a major crop seriously affected by drought. Previously, we cloned a transcription factor ABP9 from maize that its overexpression in Arabidopsis confers tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses including drought. To examine its function transgenic maize plants ABP9 were generated. In this research, we evaluated the performance of the transgenic maize plants of the four constructs of ABP9 under the control of different promoters, namely Pabp9-ABP9.1A, Pubi-ABP9.1B, Pubi-ABP9.2 and Pubi-ABP9-3xFLAG under both drought at vegetative and reproductive stages and well watered conditions in the field and identified several transgenic events showed high level of tolerance to drought stress. This research confirms that those transgenic maize events (201, 206, 212 and 214 of Pabp9-ABP9.1A), (604, 606, 611, 612 616 and 617 of Pubi-ABP9.1B), (702, 705, 713, 714 and 717of Pubi-ABP9.2) and (809 and 815) Pubi-ABP9-3xFLAG acquired higher chlorophyll fluorescence is key parameter for drought tolerance at vegetative stages compared to the non-transgenic controls in field. Moreover, this investigation will serve as a preliminary study for chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in order to understand the genetic and physiological background of ABP9 to drought stress tolerance in transgenic maize.

Biography:

S N Al-Nadhari has completed his PhD in Plant Pathology (Plant Nematology) at College of Food and Agriculture, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia in 2014. He is currently working as Researcher and Reviewer in Technology and Innovation Unit in Rector's for Graduate studies & Scientific Research Sciences.

Abstract:

A greenhouse study was conducted to compare the relative efficacy of different approaches to manage Meloidogyne incognita on green bean. These approaches include chemical (fumigant, non-fumigant, seed dressing, and seed dip), biological (the egg-parasitic fungus, Paecilomyces lilacinus and the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus sp.), physical (soil solarization), and cultural (chicken litter and urea) methods. Nine different control materials and application methods were compared. Two important parameters were considered: plant response (plant growth and root galling) and nematode reproduction (production of eggs and the reproduction factor Rf). The results showed that the use of chicken litter as an organic fertilizer severely affected the growth and survival of the seedlings. Therefore, this treatment was removed from the evaluation test. All of the other treatments were found to be effective against nematode reproduction, but with different levels of efficacy. The eight treatments decreased (38.9-99.8%) root galling, increased plant growth and suppressed nematode reproduction. Based on three important criteria, namely, the gall index (GI), egg mass index (EMI), and reproduction factor (RF), the tested materials and methods were categorized into three groups according to their relative control efficacy under the applied test conditions. The three groups were as follows: 1) the relatively high effective group (GI=1.0-1.4, Rf=0.07-0.01), which included the fumigant dazomet, the non-fumigant fenamiphos, soil solarization, and seed dip with 1 fenamiphos; 2) the relatively moderate effective group (GI=3.4-4.0, Rf=0.24-0.60), which included seed dressing with fenamiphos and urea; and 3) the relatively less effective group (GI=5.0, Rf=32.2-37.2), which included Paecilomyces lilacinus and Glomus sp.

Break: Coffee Break: 16:30-16:50 @ Foyer